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Concrete Resurfacing – Creating The Mix

Posted by on 4:34 pm in Concrete Coatings | 0 comments

Concrete Resurfacing – Creating The Mix

You should not mix more than one bag at a time. A professional tip is to use a 0.5 inch drill and paddle mixer to get the best results. As a rule of thumb, you will need around 3.5 quarts of water per 40 pound bag of mix. If you are resurfacing in warm weather, use cold water and if you are resurfacing in cold weather, use warm water. Make sure you have a large bucket; a 5 gallon plastic bucket is ideal. Pour most of the water in first followed by most of the mix. Start mixing the combination until a smooth consistency has been achieved; let it rest for a few minutes before mixing again. Use the remaining water or mix to ensure the right consistency is achieved. Spray the concrete surface with water before application; this prevents the concrete drawing moisture from the resurfacer. Click here to learn more about our resurfacing...

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Concrete Resurfacing – Surface Cleaning

Posted by on 4:32 pm in Concrete Coatings | 0 comments

Concrete Resurfacing – Surface Cleaning

Once the concrete is deemed suitable for resurfacing, the next step is thorough cleaning of the surface. In most cases, a garden hose is sufficient but it may be better to use a pressure washer. If you decide to go down the more thorough route, use a 3,500 psi washer for best results. Remove any oil or paint stains from the concrete before moving on to the next step. Click here to learn more about our resurfacing...

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Concrete Resurfacing – Repairing Small Cracks

Posted by on 4:31 pm in Concrete Coatings | 0 comments

Concrete Resurfacing – Repairing Small Cracks

While small cracks don’t indicate any structural problems with concrete, it is best to fix the issue as soon as possible. Once a small cracks appears, wear and tear will inevitably cause it to expand. ‘Minor’ usually refers to cracks that are 0.5 inches or less deep and 0.25 inches or less wide. Here is a quick 5 step process to repair minor cracks and get your concrete ready for resurfacing: 1. Clean the cracks with a wire brush. Get rid of loose debris and vacuum. Be sure to thoroughly remove any oil or grease around the crack. 2. Use clean sand to fill up the crack; if it is more than 0.5 inches deep, only fill the crack up to 0.5 inches with sand. 3. Purchase premixed concrete crack sealant, shake the container and cut its tip to the same width as the crack. 4. Apply the sealant in layers of 0.25 inches and if you need to force the sealant into the crack, use a putty knife. Allow each layer to set overnight before trying to add another one. 5. Do not fill the cracks beyond the surface level of the concrete. Don’t walk or drive across it until the sealant has been fully cured. Click here to learn more about our resurfacing...

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Concrete Resurfacing – Surface Preparation

Posted by on 4:30 pm in Concrete Coatings | 0 comments

Concrete Resurfacing – Surface Preparation

You should look upon concrete resurfacing as cosmetic finishes rather than products for concrete repair. Ultimately, there is no point embarking on a concrete resurfacing project unless you have addressed all structural problems. In simple terms, don’t continue with the project if there are chunks of concrete that have broken away, lifted or sunk. It isn’t hard to determine whether there is a structural problem as the signs are usually obvious. If you find evidence of structural damage, there is an underlying problem which necessitates the replacement of some or even all the concrete. Further clear signs of damage are deep and large cracks running through the slab or if you can see the surface turning into pieces of powder or sand. It is a mistake to try resurfacing concrete in this condition because all you can do is mask the problems for a short period of time. Resurfacing is very effective on concrete with minor pits or cracks as long as these issues are repaired before the project begins. Bear in mind that most concrete resurfacers are not reliable beyond a depth of 0.5 inches. Click here to learn more about our resurfacing...

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Is Epoxy Resin Safe to Use?

Posted by on 12:47 pm in Concrete Coatings, Epoxy Flooring | 0 comments

Is Epoxy Resin Safe to Use?

Although modern epoxy resin is safer than previous products, you can still become sensitized to its components. Some resins may cause a significant primary skin irritation, and occasionally solid epoxy resins have been known to cause skin rashes. Nonetheless, new epoxy resin formulas are a lot less likely to cause adverse reactions than common liquid epoxy resins. If your eyes come into contact with epoxy resin, you should only suffer from mild irritation. Additionally, this type of resin is not very volatile, so inhalation is unlikely. Obviously, it is still wise to take precautions through good housekeeping practices and ventilation. Finally, epoxy resins by themselves are low on the acute oral toxicity scale. The two most common ways to become sensitized to epoxy resin is through breathing it in or coating your skin with epoxy components. To avoid such issues, you should do the following when applying epoxy: Wear tops with long sleeves and long trousers, along with vinyl gloves. Do not use solvents. Wear shoes and socks. Use hot, soapy water on any splashes as soon as possible. Continue reading about epoxy...

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Is It Okay to Put Another Coat of Epoxy Over a Coat of Cured Epoxy?

Posted by on 12:30 pm in Concrete Coatings, Epoxy Flooring | 0 comments

Is It Okay to Put Another Coat of Epoxy Over a Coat of Cured Epoxy?

This is perfectly acceptable, as a chemical bond is not possible once the epoxy has cured. Therefore, a “mechanical” bond is required, which means the cured epoxy should be sanded lightly before you apply the next coat. The first coat needs to have a surface that is almost white. It’s a good idea to use 80- to 120-grit sandpaper; do not use finer paper. If a blush or bloom has developed on the first coat, it is crucial that you remove it. With most epoxies, it is possible to remove the blush or bloom by washing the epoxy with warm water that has a little bit of dishwashing liquid in it. Another fast way of removing it is through the use of a trisodium phosphate solution. Continue reading about epoxy...

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What Kind of Maintenance Do Epoxy Floors Need?

Posted by on 12:30 pm in Concrete Coatings, Epoxy Flooring | 0 comments

What Kind of Maintenance Do Epoxy Floors Need?

Although it ultimately depends on the level of traffic and usage your floor will be subjected to, all epoxy flooring needs to be touched up or recoated occasionally. With a simple maintenance routine, you can enjoy your epoxy flooring for a very long time. We recommend sweeping your floor on a daily basis, as that removes foreign objects and safety hazards. A mechanized sweeper or soft-bristled broom should be used. You should also wash your epoxy floors weekly using a mechanized soft-bristled floor scrubber if possible. Spills are a safety hazard and can damage your floor, depending on the substance, so remove them immediately. Substances such as acid, harsh solvents, and caustics can do major damage to your floor if they are not quickly removed. One of the best things about epoxy flooring is its resistance to staining, but you still need to remove stains as fast as possible before they get the chance to set. Finally, we recommend keeping sharp objects away, as it is possible for an implement to gouge the floor and ruin the epoxy coating. You should talk to our professional epoxy flooring team in Phoenix for more information. Continue reading about epoxy...

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What Is Amine Blush and How Do I Remove It?

Posted by on 12:28 pm in Concrete Coatings, Epoxy Flooring | 0 comments

What Is Amine Blush and How Do I Remove It?

Amine blush occurs when the epoxy releases a blush to the surface and creates a wax-like film that sits on the cured epoxy resin surface. It is a relatively rare occurrence and seems to happen during a strange mix of humidity and temperature that is not easy to isolate. Fortunately, it is a minor inconvenience and can quickly and easily be removed from the surface. It is common for people to think the epoxy has not cured when amine blush occurs, so you should check and see if you can dig your fingernail into the coating. If no mark has been made, the epoxy has cured and the surface has amine blush. Another test involves rubbing your fingers along the surface; you should see greasy streaks left behind. You can sand the surface to get rid of the blush, but this is a lengthy and expensive process, since a lot of sandpaper will be required. A simpler way to deal with the problem is to use warm water and dishwashing liquid to clean the surface. Diluted trisodium phosphate is a fast way to remove amine blush. You should always wash the surface regardless of whether it has blush or not, because washing gives you a glimpse of what the finished surface will look like after varnishing, as imperfections are easier to spot. Continue reading about epoxy...

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Can I Use Epoxy in Cold Weather?

Posted by on 12:28 pm in Concrete Coatings, Epoxy Flooring | 0 comments

Can I Use Epoxy in Cold Weather?

As long as the epoxy is warm, this is okay. When laying epoxy in cold weather conditions, in an unheated garage, for example, make sure it is kept off the cold concrete floor or placed over mild heat. Once you have finished the job for the day, place the bottles in a box and store them in a warm place; an airing cupboard or boiler room would be ideal. If the weather is extremely cold and you are working in a shed with no heating, for example, it is best to warm the wood with a heat source instead of trying to heat the entire shed. The trouble with epoxy resin is the fact that it becomes viscous when exposed to the cold for any significant period of time, and it will eventually crystallize. As a result, you will find it tough to dispense, and mixing it will be a significant challenge. If this happens, you need to be patient when bringing the resin back to a useable state. This can be achieved by warming the bottles and contents in a process that takes several hours and is likely to be extremely frustrating. It also means a great deal of time can be lost on a project if you only have a few hours at a time to work. The best method of heating the epoxy resin is to place the bottles in hot water. Continue reading about epoxy...

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